Lumber River, North Carolina & South Carolina, USA

What makes this area unique?
If you live in northeast USA and have a hard time saying goodbye to summer, this water trail is God's gift to you! The winding cyprus channels of the northern Lumber River give rookie canoeists inescapable navigation practice, and the sleepy snake of iced-tea riverway as the Lumber nears the Peedee will test your newly built muscles and gift you with plenty of swimming and galumphing opportunities. Camp under a family of oak and pine trees, or bask on the aptly named white sugar-sand beaches for which the Lumber is famous.

Flora & Fauna: Deciduous and evergreen forest, cyprus, Spanish moss, beaver, lizard, snake, many varieties of waterfowl.

Terrain: Flatwater river, swamp, flatland, beach.

Best Time to Paddle: September-October

Type of Trip/Route Options: Canoe

Y Day Trip
Y Weekend Trip
Y 4 to 7-Day Trip
N 7 to 14-Day Trip
N Loop Trip
Y Shuttle Service Nearby

Hazards: Unmaintained northern sections of the river pose risk of strainers in spring and at flood stage; fire ants; snakes; camping becomes extremely limited or impossible at high water levels.

Where to Find Maps/Charts: usgs.gov

Permits Required: No

Pets Allowed: Yes, rules apply.

Itinerary: 

Lumber River 7-Day Itinerary: 68 Miles

Day 1
Drive to Willoughby Road River Access and unload.
Shuttle trailer to Gallivants Ferry.
Put on the river at Willoughby Road, paddle 4.8 miles to established campsite at Piney Island.

Day 2
Paddle about 15 miles to scout camp after Princess Ann.

Day 3
Paddle about 10 miles to scout camp after Fair Bluff

Day 4
Paddle about 15 miles to scout camp river left on sand bar after the old railroad bridge.

Day 5
Solo day

Day 6
Paddle about 13 miles to scout camp on Little Pee Dee, after SC 917.

Day 7
Paddle about 10 miles to your trailer at Gallivants Ferry.

Notes
Choose an alternate river if water levels are high. During fall hurricane season and spring floods, finding scout camping is nearly impossible because this ecosystem is mostly swamp.
Beware of fire ants when collecting or sitting on dry logs, and on sand beaches. Fire ant bites have caused anaphylactic shock in some individuals.

Emergency Contact Information: 
Park Information: 910-628-4564
Optional activities in the area: 

Fishing.